How does the Tier 1 Anticipation ability work if you have Intellect Edge 1?

How does the Tier 1 Anticipation ability work if you have Intellect Edge 1?

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Tier 1: Anticipation (1 Intellect point). You look ahead to see how your actions might unfold. You have an asset for the first task you perform before the end of the next round. Enabler.

When something requires you to spend points from a stat Pool, your Edge for that stat reduces the cost. It also reduces the cost of applying Effort to a roll. For example, let’s say you have a mental blast ability, and activating it costs 1 point from your Intellect Pool. Subtract your Intellect Edge from the activation cost, and the result is how many points you must spend to use the mental blast. If using your Edge reduces the cost to 0, you can use the ability for free. You can use Edge for a particular stat only once per action. For example, if you apply Effort to a Might attack roll and to your damage, you can use your Might Edge to reduce the cost of one of those uses of Effort, not both. If you spend 1 Intellect point to activate your mind blast and one level of Effort to decrease the difficulty of the attack roll, you can use your Intellect Edge to reduce the cost of one of those things, not both.

These abilities are called enablers. Using one of these abilities is not considered an action. Enablers either function constantly (such as being able to wear heavy armor, which isn’t an action) or happen as part of another action (such as adding fire damage to your weapon damage, which happens as part of your attack action). If a special ability is an enabler, the end of the ability’s description says “Enabler” to remind you.
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Intellect Edge 1 would eliminate the cost of Anticipation down to 0. It is not considered an action (due to being an Enabler), and so your Edge would still apply on the actual action that is buffed by Anticipation.

In other words, having Anticipation and Intellect Edge 1 means having a major bonus on all of your rolls. That cannot be right. What am I missing here?

Comments

  • I don't think it's any more powerful than any other ability. The Focus 'Travels Through Time' has a whole bunch of other potential problems that your GM should be exploring; it grants an Asset. An Asset is usually lowering a Task by 1 step; the same as someone Trained in a skill. The difference is that the character has used their ability to "see the future".


  • These abilities are called enablers. Using one of these abilities is not considered an action. Enablers either function constantly (such as being able to wear heavy armor, which isn’t an action) or happen as part of another action (such as adding fire damage to your weapon damage, which happens as part of your attack action). If a special ability is an enabler, the end of the ability’s description says “Enabler” to remind you.

    

    My take on this is enablers are not actions in and of themselves but become part of the attempted action. This means if you use Edge to reduce Anticipation's cost down to 0, you cannot also use Edge to effect that action. You may still apply Effort but at full cost. This mechanic allows for the use of abilities (enabler) without foregoing an action that turn. For example, if Anticipation were not an enabler, you would have to activate it on one round and then "use" it the next, greatly reducing any benefit. Enablers are just modifiers to actions. An analogy would be the Adverb/Verb relationship; the Verb (action) is what actually happens and the Adverb (enabler) modifies how it happens.
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